Unlock your Iphone without pressing home button

How-To Geek

In iOS 10, Apple made a small but fundamental change to the way touch ID users unlock their phone phone. If you’re tired of seeing “Press home to open” or “Press home to unlock” every time to you grab your phone, here’s how to switch it back to the way it was in iOS 9.

When using an iOS 9 device with the Touch ID fingerprint recognition feature, you could simply press the home button on your device and it would wake and unlock the device in one clean swoop. Finger to home button, click, unlocked.

The lock screen itself and the unlocking process both got a big makeover with iOS 10. The most obvious change is the death of the slide-to-unlock feature. On prior versions of iOS–going all the back to the early days (long before finger print recognition)–you swiped right to unlock your phone (and put in a passcode if you used one). Even when Touch ID was introduced, the swipe-to-unlock feature remained.

In iOS 10, however, if you swipe right you don’t unlock the phone. Instead, swiping will pull up the camera. If you swipe left, you’ll pull up the lock screen widgets. In addition, the Touch ID unlock flow was tweaked slightly so that pressing on the home button still activates the screen and unlocks the device, but it doesn’t return you to where you left off (e.g. the home screen page you were on or the app you were using). Instead the device unlocks and sits on the lock screen. If you want to return to where you were, à la iOS 9, you have to then click one more time.

That sounds entirely pointless, right? Well, in fairness to Apple, there is actually a benefit to their new method. When an iOS device is unlocked, the apps on the device have access to encrypted data. If you use the default iOS 10 Touch ID unlock method, this means that when you swipe right to open the camera, the camera isn’t in tourist mode but has full access to your photo library. It also paves the way for Apple to allow other apps to appear on the lock screen system and access encrypted data.

While that sounds nice and all, we don’t need that feature, and so far this is the most annoying change in iOS 10. With that in mind, let’s change it back.

(Obviously, if you don’t have a phone with a Touch ID-enabled home button, this isn’t nearly as annoying a change–it just means you’ll have to press the home button a second time instead of swiping to unlock. The below guide is intended for Touch ID Users only.)

Change the iOS 10 Touch ID Behavior Back to iOS 9’s

Changing the behavior of the Touch ID unlock is trivial if you know where to look. To change the functionality back to the iOS 9 style you’re familiar with, simply launch the Settings app.

Navigate in the Settings menu to the “General” entry and select it.

Scroll down a ways until you see the entry for “Accessibility”. Select it.

In the Accessibility menu, again, scroll quite a bit until you see the entry for “Home Button” and select it.

In the Home Button menu you’ll find an entry, turned off by default in iOS 10, labeled “Rest Finger to Unlock”. Toggle it on, as seen below.

You can now press the Home button and, with a single press, both awake and unlock your iOS device.

You can stil get WIN10 for free from WIN7/8

How-To Geek

w10productkey

Microsoft’s free Windows 10 upgrade offer is over–or is it? There’s still a way to activate Windows 10 with a Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 key, in addition to Microsoft’s accessibility offer.
As part of Windows 10’s November update, Microsoft changed the Windows 10 installer disc to also accept Windows 7 or 8.1 keys. This allowed users to perform a clean install Windows 10 and enter a valid Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 key during installation. Windows 10 would then report that key to Microsoft’s servers, and Windows 10’s actiation servers would give your PC a “digital entitlement” (now a “digital license”) to continue using Windows 10 for free, just as if you had upgraded.

This also works from within Windows 10. Even if you don’t provide a key during the installation process, you can head to Settings > Update & Security > Activation and enter a Windows 7 or 8.1 key here instead of a Windows 10 key. Your PC will receive a digital entitlement.

Now, even though the free upgrade offer is technically over, this method still works in the Anniversary Update, either when installing Windows 10 with Anniversary Update media or by entering the key after installing Windows 10. Enter any Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 key that hasn’t previously been used to upgrade to 10, and Microsoft’s servers will give your PC’s hardware a new digital license that will allow you to continue using Windows 10 indefinitely on that PC.

Microsoft hasn’t released any sort of statement about this upgrade method at all. It’s possible that Microsoft will disable it soon, but it’s also possible Microsoft will look the other way and keep this trick around to encourage more Windows 10 upgrades for a long time to come. Microsoft isn’t talking, so we have no clue.This process is easy. First, you’ll need a Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 key. If you have one of those lying around, great. If you don’t, you can use a tool like NirSoft’s ProduKey to find the key currently in use on your Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 PC. Write it down.

Be sure you have backups of your important files before continuing. Even if you plan on performing an upgrade install, something could go wrong. It’s always a good idea to have backups, especially when installing a new operating system.

Create Windows 10 installation media if you don’t already have it lying around. You can do this with Microsoft’s Windows 10 media creation tool. Select “Create installation media for another PC” and the tool will offer to create a bootable USB flash drive or burn a bootable DVD.

Insert the installation media into the computer you want to upgrade, reboot, and boot from the installation media. Install Windows 10 normally. You can perform an upgrade installation that keeps your existing files or a clean installation that wipes your system drive.

When you’re asked to enter a key, enter the Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 key. The installer will accept this key and the installation process will continue normally.

After you’ve installed Windows 10, head to Settings > Update & Security > Activation and you should see that your PC has a digital license.

If you didn’t enter a key during the installation process, you can enter a Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 key right in this window when you’re asked to provide a Windows 10 key. Windows will check in with Microsoft’s servers and give your PC a digital license for Windows 10.

It’s that simple. If you ever want to reinstall Windows 10 in the future, you should be able to use the same Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 key you entered here. That key will be associated with a “digital license” on Microsoft’s servers, allowing you to continue reinstalling Windows 10 even if Microsoft disables this method of acquiring Windows 10.

You can also sign in to your new PC with a Microsoft account and that key will be associated with your Microsoft account, making it easy to reactivate your digital license if you ever need to reinstall Windows 10 later.